Thursday Book Review – The Didache

Beloved, let’s go way back again to some late first century, early second century, church writing. It’s amazing to me that we still have these types of books after all these years. The Didache, also known as The Teaching of the Twelve Apostles, is an anonymous treatise which quotes the New Testament heavily.

I love these types of documents, as it not only gives us a look into the early church fathers, but also clearly shows the New Testament was understood to be Holy Spirit inspired previous to the fourth century. The Didache also shows that Christians have historically been against abortion and infanticide. Obviously the Didache, along with other patristic era writings, are not inspired. However, they are a wonderful look into the early church.

I think the Didache would be the perfect introduction for anyone beginning to study the history of the church. It has been said that, should we lose the New Testament, we could put it back together with the writings of the patristic fathers. The Didache is a prime example of that fact, thus I must highly recommend this short book to all believers young and old. Being 1,900 years old, it’s in the public domain, which means it’s free, yay!

Here is the audio version, kindle version, paperback, and last but not least a PDF. As always, beloved brethren, be good Berean’s and study to show yourselves approved.

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Thursday Book Review – Ignatius

A couple weeks ago we returned to the Patristic Fathers with a review of Polycarps writings. Both Polycarp and Ignatius of Antioch (35-108) were disciples by the Apostle John. Through the original letters written we can see that Polycarp and Ignatius were friends.

When we consider that the earliest copy of Plato’s Tetralogies is over a thousand years past his life, it’s amazing to me that we have such a treasure trove of the early church writers. This is our history, brethren, and it’s a wonderful thing to have! The Epistle of Ignatius is a short, fantastic book for any believer who wants to look more into the early church. It’s in the public domain, so it’s available in a Kindle version, audio version, pdf version, and of course the good old fashion paper back.

I pray you’ll be blessed by this book, dear friends, as I was. And as always beloved brethren be good Berean’s and study to show yourselves approved.

Thursday Book Review – First Apology by Justin Martyr

Today I’m going to review the First Apology by Justin Martyr. Justin was born in Samaria in 100 AD and was martyred in Rome in 165 AD. This means it’s highly likely Justin new personally, or at least new of, Polycarp. Polycarp was personally disciples by John, so you can see the line of faithful men carrying the Gospel from generation to generation. Justin studied philosophy but was unfulfilled by what he learned, until he heard the Gospel. 


His works, like his first and second apology, were aimed at forming a legal defense to stop the extreme persecution of his Christian brothers and sisters. The First Apology of Justin Martyr, written to the Emperor of Rome, is as important for the church to read as the Pilgrims Progress, in my opinion. Not just for the apologetic aspect, but the historical content. It’s not just a blessing to read how our spiritual fathers lived, and died for Christ, but it also gives us a glimpse into the early church practices. 

In other words, beloved, I recommend this book to everyone! It’s almost 1900 years old, so it’s in the public domain. This means you can download a free PDF version, listen to a free audio version, or purchase an inexpensive Kindle version. I hope you’ll be edified by this book, dear brethren, and as always be good Berean’s and study to show yourselves approved.

The First Apology of Justin Martyr PDF
The First Apology of Justin Martyr Kindle Version

Historical Theology – Lectures by Dr. Nathan Busenitz

#Dr.NathanBusenitz #HistoricalTheology #MastersSeminary

Hello again beloved friends, I just wanted to take a quick moment to recommend this lecture series on historical theology. It’s not just absolutely fascinating, it’s also pertinent to the times we’re living in. There are so many theological falsehoods today, it’s helpful to ground yourself with a greater knowledge of the historical beliefs of the church.


I find this to be particularly imperative for the leaders of the church, and the men in each household. My daughter is 6 and she wants to be exactly like daddy (that’s her wearing his glasses up top) I am so blessed to be able to teach her, and we have a lot of fun learning, however when daddy speaks she hangs on every word. Perhaps that’s the case in your home? That makes a clear understanding of theology even more important. We need to know how to correct our brothers in sisters lovingly, and also how to teach those under us.

I hope you will all find this as interesting, and instructive, as I have!