Throwback Thursday: A Book Review of The Soul Winner

Back in May of 2017 I reviewed this excellent book, you can read the original post here.

The Soul Winner: How to Lead Sinners to the Savior by C. H. Spurgeon was published in 1895 shortly after the author’s death. This book, this book…how can I possibly describe it? It’s not taken out, it’s a five-star restaurant. It’s the type that you sit and eat slowly, enjoying every precious bite. Read this book with pen and paper, you’ll want to take notes. Rarely is there a book I enjoy to read so thoroughly that I immediately plan to read it again once I’m done. This is one of those books. It should be in the study of every church leader, parent, teacher, or human being. If you know anyone who is unsaved you should read this book. If you have children, you need this book.

It’s written for students, so it reads much like a lecture. Spurgeon has a way of explaining things that I haven’t heard or seen in our times. He doesn’t over complicate matters or reaches outside of Biblical boundaries. Like many of the old books I’ve reviewed, this book is available on the Kindle app and is very inexpensive on Amazon. I hope you’ll all enjoy this book as much as I did, and if you can, make sure your pastor finds himself with a copy.

Yesterday I showed Spurgeon’s testimony in his own words, it might be beneficial to read that here before you read his book. I’ve also reviewed several other Christian books if you would like to read more you can herehere, or here. I’m also always looking for great Christian books to read, so feel free to leave suggestions in the comments below.

Thursday Book Review – The Secret Power in Prayer

#spurgeonbook #bookreview

Hello beloved, I have another Spurgeon book to review for today! We can never read too many books from the Prince of Preachers can we?

A while back our brother in Christ, Pastor Jim reviewed this book. I’m in a season, and have been for several months, of learning the whys, when’s, where’s, and how’s of praying. Previous to this book, and one other resource I’ll recommend at the end, I had been praying for help understanding prayer. God is a gracious God, He answers even the weakest believers prayer.

After being saved prayer flowed out of me like an uncontrollable force. As I grow in faith my hearts greatest desire is obedience to God, to love Him with all my heart, soul, strength, and mind. This book, The Secret Power in Prayer, has been extremely enlightening. Throughout the book, based on a sermon, Spurgeon uses John 15:7 to explain the power of prayer in the believers life. With this verse he shows that when Gods Word abides in us our will lines up with Gods will. I recommend this book to all believers, young and old. Kayliegh is reading it, she is 7, and she’s enjoying it as much as I have.

As a Christian, aware of Gods sovereignty, I would never want to be outside of Gods will, much less pray to Him about something outside of His will. But then…why pray at all? It’s His will be done, right? Beloved brethren, I couldn’t stop praying even if I wanted to. However, I still want to understand what God’s sovereign purpose in prayer is. Below is a lecture series that was such a tremendous blessing to me, in regards to prayer. As always, dear friends, be good Berean’s and study to show yourselves approved.

Hymns from the Past – Amidst Us Our Beloved Stands

I think this might be the first hymn I’ve written about that Charles Spurgeon wrote. I hope you enjoy this, beloved, and have a wonderful day of fellowship, growing in the grace and the knowledge of our Lord, Christ Jesus.

Amidst us our Beloved stands,
and bids us view His pierced hands;
points to the wounded feet and side,
blest emblems of the Crucified.

What food luxurious loads the board,
when, at His table, sits the Lord!
The cup how rich, the bread how sweet,
when Jesus deigns the guests to meet!

If now, with eyes defiled and dim,
we see the signs, but see not Him;
O may His love the scales displace,
and bid us see Him face to face!

Our former transports we recount,
when with Him in the holy mount:
these cause our souls to thirst anew
His marred but lovely face to view.

A Book Review Of Around the Wicket Gate

A Book Review Of Around The Wicket Gate by Charles Spurgeon


Around the Wicket Gate by Charles Spurgeon is a Book he wrote addressing those who are nearly saved but for varies, reasons have yet to enter the ‘Wicket Gate’. I adore John Bunyons The Pilgrims Progress, and happily enjoyed Spurgeon’s use of the allegory. Through out the book, he adds little bits of pieces of the characters and adventures, all the while imploring the reader to into the gate.


This book was published in 1890 and is now in the public domain. This means you can either buy a copy for yourself, enjoy a PDF version online, or hear an audible version of it. We travel none stop, so I appreciate the Kindle version of books. However I do have a running list of books I want in my future library, this book is on that list.

A dear, sweet part of this book was when he referenced the ‘technology’ of his time in comparison with their great, great grandparents. The point he was making was that it would be difficult for his grandparents to trust him when it came to little pieces of wood that make fire (matches) or getting on a train or sending telegrams. I thought this was such a beautiful illustration of how we need to trust in the Lord and a neat way to be brought back to his time period.


I recommend this book to everyone who knows someone hanging out ‘around the Wicket Gate’. The simplicity with which he explains the gospel is both profound, and accurate.

Testimony of Charles Spurgeon

The testimony of the Prince of Preachers, Charles Spurgeon, in his own words.

Testimonies are edifying to believers and instructive to those seeking Christ. Here is a wonderful testimony of Charles Spurgeon, the Prince of Preachers.

C. H. Spurgeon
Charles-Spurgeon-age-twenty-three

“Through the Lord’s restraining grace, and the holy influence of my early home life, both at my father’s and my grandfather’s, I was kept from certain outward forms of sin in which others indulged; and, sometimes, when I began to take stock of myself, I really thought I was quite a respectable lad, and might have been half inclined to boast that I was not like other boys, untruthful, dishonest, disobedient, swearing. Sabbath breaking, and so on. But, all of a sudden, I met Moses, carrying in his hand the law of God; and as he looked at me, he seemed to search me through and through with his eyes of fire. He bade me read ‘God’s Ten Words’,—the ten commandments—and as I read them, and remembered what I had been taught about their spiritual meaning as interpreted by the Lord Jesus Christ, they all seemed to join in accusing and condemning me in the sight of the thrice-holy Jehovah. Then, like Daniel, “my comeliness was turned in me into corruption, and I retained no strength;” and I understood what Paul meant when he wrote, “Now we know that what things soever the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law, that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God.”
 For years he remained under deep conviction of sin until one Sunday morning in January 1850 a snow storm forced him to cut short his intended journey and turn in to a Primitive Methodist chapel in Colchester. “The minister did not come that morning; he was snowed up, I suppose. At last, a very thin looking man, a shoemaker, or tailor, or something of that sort, went up into the pulpit to preach. . . . He was obliged to stick to his text, for the simple reason that he had little else to say. The text was, “Look unto me, and be ye saved, all the ends of the earth.”

Spurgeon
Charles-Spurgeon

 When he had managed to spin out ten minutes or so, he was at the end of his tether. Then he looked at me under the gallery, and I daresay, with so few present, he knew me to be a stranger. Just fixing his eyes on me, as if he knew all my heart, he said, “Young man, you look very miserable.” Well, I did, but I had not been accustomed to have remarks made from the pulpit on my personal appearance before. However, it was a good blow, struck right home. He continued, “and you always will be miserable—miserable in life, and miserable in death—if you don’t obey my text; but if you obey now, this moment, you will be saved.” Then, lifting up his hands, he shouted, as only a Primitive Methodist could do, “Young man, look to Jesus Christ. Look! Look! Look! You have nothin’ to do but to look and live.” I saw at once the way of salvation . . . I had been waiting to do fifty things, but when I heard that word, “Look!” What a charming word it seemed to me! Oh! I looked until l could almost have looked my eyes away. There and then the cloud was gone, the darkness had rolled away, and that moment I saw the sun; and I could have risen that instant, and sung with the most enthusiastic of them, of the precious blood of Christ, and the simple faith which looks alone to HIM . . .

E’er since by faith I saw the stream
Thy flowing wounds supply
Redeeming love has been my theme
And shall be till I die

I found this testimony, among the other thousands of places to find it, here and I hope it blesses you as much as it blessed me. For my personal testimony you can go here and here. As always friends, be good Bereans, study to find yourselves approved! God bless