Christmas Hymn – O Come, Let Us Adore Him

Today, dear ones, I’m delighted to share with you a hymn that Becca chose for today. Tomorrow we’ll be dropping our Christmas special, so we’re excited about the holidays! Of course, I’ve been decided for Christmas so a few weeks now. I cheated and did not wait for the bird. Have you begun your tree, and what’s your favorite Christmas hymn?


O come, all ye faithful, joyful and triumphant
Come ye, O come ye to Bethlehem; 
Come and behold Him, born the King of angels:

O come, let us adore Him, 
O come, let us adore Him, 
O come, let us adore Him, Christ, the Lord.

Sing, choirs of angels, sing in exultation,
Sing all ye bright hosts of heav’n above; 
Glory to God, all glory in the highest

O come, let us adore Him, 
O come, let us adore Him, 
O come, let us adore Him, Christ, the Lord.

Yea, Lord, we greet Thee, born this happy morning,
Jesus, to Thee be all glory giv’n:
Word of the Father, now in flesh appearing

O come, let us adore Him, 
O come, let us adore Him, 
O come, let us adore Him, Christ, the Lord.


I mentioned previously, I think, that P&R Publishers is partnering with the Hub. They’ve got a tremendous amount of books to review or giveaway, and a long list of authors we could interview. So we’re asking you, dear friends, which ones you’d like to see more of. I hope you’re all having a blessed weekend filled with sweet fellowship. As always, beloved brethren, be good Berean’s and study to show yourselves approved.

Author: lnhereford

I am a Christian, wife, mother, podcaster and homeschooler currently traveling the United States with my loving husband and darling daughter!

5 thoughts on “Christmas Hymn – O Come, Let Us Adore Him”

  1. Hi sister! That’s great that T&H has partnered with solid publisher, P&R. As you know, I have a very narrow focus. P&R published “Roman Catholicism” by Loraine Boettner in the early 1960s and it was one of the most popular resources on the RCC from an evangelical perspective for decades. I searched their website for current books on Catholicism and I see they have one on the theology of Karl Rahner (1904-1984) by Camden M. Bucey. I don’t know a lot about Rahner but I should. He was a liberal Jesuit theologian who helped steer the RCC towards modernism and ecumenism. Leonardo De Chirico endorses the book which tells me Bucey does not endorse Rahner’s theology but dissects it. I might have to purchase the Kindle version someday. I wish P&R had a 2019 equivalent of “Roman Catholicism,” but few Protestant publishers want to fight that battle these days.

    You know by now that I’m a curious nerd. I was wondering about the origins of “O Come All Ye Faithful” and did some googling. I found the Christmas carol is widely attributed to English Roman Catholic, John Francis Wade. But even more interesting is the claim that the lyrics were a cryptic ode to the Catholic pretender to the English throne, Charles Edward Stuart aka Bonnie Prince Charlie.
    https://www.dur.ac.uk/news/newsitem/?itemno=7328

    Please know I’m not advocating that we need to boycott the carol, the lyrics at face value are beautiful and worshipful, but I know you also enjoy history and would be interested. Many popular songs and nursery rhymes of those politically/religiously restricted times had cryptic meanings.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, brother, you know you can’t dangle a juicy historical carrot in front of me! I’m fascinated by the political meanings behind the lullabies we sing today! I’m going to have to check this story out, I love knowing where these songs come from. It says that it’s attributed to him, does that mean some question whether or not he wrote it?

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s