A Review of The Pilgrim’s Progress

This is a personal review of the 1678 book The Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan.

“The friends and the pleasures of which you speak cannot compare with the joys which I seek.” – Christianfullsizeoutput_11d4

Have you ever made a rich, creamy alfredo sauce from scratch and then dumped it over your favorite carb? Like tortellini? YUM! You eat a bowl, foil the rest, and the next day it seems like it tastes even better.

I don’t drink so I can’t compare Pilgrims Progress to fine wine, but I LOVE me some homemade alfredo sauce and it certainly gets better over time. That is how the Pilgrims Progress was to me. I don’t think this book is discussed enough, like so many books written long ago it’s been forgotten in most circles. Or the adaptations have been placed over the original…this is like comparing store bought to the real deal, from scratch, alfredo sauce. Please! Don’t get me started…

The Pilgrims Progress was written by a guy named John Bunyan and published way back in 1678 England. It follows a man who is dreaming, and in his dreams, sees the aptly named Christian who is fleeing the wrath to come. He has a heavy burden on his back, which he can’t seem to be rid of. His wife and children think he’s crazy, but he sets off on a pilgrimage anyway. What I love is that after it follows him to the end, it goes back and tells the story of his wife and kids! LOVE it! From beginning to end the depiction of true Christianity is summarized perfectly.

I’m not sure about 1678 Christians, but I can tell you that through the years this book has become precious. Like second-day chicken tortellini, The Pilgrims Progress is rich with age. When I first tried to read it, the adapted version, I was still just playing Christian. I thought reading something like it would help the persona. But I didn’t get through the first chapter.

After getting saved I found the original version and was so greatly blessed by the story I cherished the times I spent reading it with my daughter.IMG_3102 It was like reading my own story, I often checked to make sure it was really written so long ago! How could something is written in the 17th century be so closely linked to a 21st century Christian? I cannot recommend this book highly enough, and if you are a fan of the KJV style you’ll certainly appreciate The Pilgrim’s Progress. Skip the movie, like so frequently is the case, the book is better.

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This book is fit for my first book review (which I’ll try to do weekly) as it was the first Christian book I finished after getting saved. Like Johns gospel is often described, The Pilgrim’s Progress is deep enough for an elephant to wade through yet shallow enough for a child to play in.

 

It’s one of those books you’ll read repeatedly and never get tired of! Plus, it’s on Kindle, seriously? Yeah, I love technology too!

There are several different versions with illustrations, or the updated versions, most a buck or more. Here’s one example from Amazon. As far as book reviews go I doubt I’ll find one so well priced. Did I mention I love technology? I hope you all enjoy a trip through time in this classic!

https://www.amazon.com/Pilgrims-Progress-Illustrated-John-Bunyan-ebook/dp/B00OJXZPYU/ref=sr_1_9?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1492080178&sr=1-9&keywords=the+pilgrims+progress

(BTW I have no affiliations here, I just didn’t want anyone spending $15 at a book store when here it is for a dollar! Yay kindle!)

 

Author: lnhereford

I am a Christian, wife, mother, and homeschooler currently traveling the United States with my loving husband and darling daughter!

3 thoughts on “A Review of The Pilgrim’s Progress”

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